• Smoking Facts on Youth and Young Adults

    Smoke addiction only starts from experimentation. However, such initiations have caused many first time smokers to become regular smokers in the future. This is the reason why the Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey (CTUMS), Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS), and the Youth Smoking Survey (YSS) in Canada have continued to facilitate the number of youths addicted to smoking.

    Fortunately, the latest statistics show that the rate of tobacco use among teens is constantly dropping these past few years. From 23 percent of adolescent, age 12 and above, the rate of smokers significantly dropped to 20.8 in 2010 of the entire population in Canada. In records, most of the current and experimental smokers were consist of men. There was a jump from 22 percent in 2009 to 24.2 percent of men smokers in 2010, but the rate of women smokers have consequently dropped from 18.5 in the past years to 17 percent in 2010.

    Despite the dropped in the population of smokers, authorities have continued to monitor the remaining number of youth who remained smoking. In addition, the prevalence and susceptibility of more youth have pushed the government to continue facilitating programs to stopped smoke use among youth and adults. In Youth Smoking Survey (YSS) in Canada, data shows 35 percent of 11-13 years old and 31 percent of 14- 15 years old have intentions to smoke in the future or accept the possibility of smoking the next year especially if their best friends offer them to do so. These kids eventually become occasional and regular smokers in the future.

    Although smoking rates among youth are found to be smaller, only at 3 percent, compared to adults which accounts to 9.6 percent of the population, most adults who become regular smokers actually started as experimental smokers at age below 18. With this, Canada carries on with the legislation and enforcement that prohibits teenage smoking along with some other programs and supporting organizations.

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    Categories: Nicotine & Smoking Related Research Study

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